Blogs
POSTED ON Thursday, 06.12.2014 / 3:03 PM

Thoughts and observations from Game 4 of the SCF.

I can empathize with the Rangers at this point. I’ve been to the Finals twice and was swept in both appearances (Chicago-1992 and Detroit-1995). Finding the confidence as a team to play your game in Game 4 is a tall order. You’re trying to push back a sea tide at this point.

First Period

Pouliot makes it 1-0 Rangers. As the period wears on you’re thinking: why does this lead feel different from others the Rangers have held in this series?

The Zuccarello delay of game penalty creates a shift in momentum. LA carried the tempo for several minutes but New York seems to stabilize. This is an important development because you know LA will be pressing later when the game is on the line. New York will need to push back at that moment if the club is going to see another day.

Notwithstanding the fact that LA is on the brink of closing out this series; it's been entertaining hockey throughout. Never more than a two goal spread.

Second Period

Gaborik off the crossbar just one minute into the period. Here they come?

With the kind of playoffs he’s had surely just once this series Lundqvist is able to steal a game for his club. He’s making a strong case for doing so tonite.

St. Louis makes it 2-0 on a gritty play driving hard to the net. To this point, this is the strongest the Rangers have looked this late in a game.

Girardi busts his stick as he makes an attempt at the net. Brown grabs the loose puck and makes a terrific move to get LA on the board. 2-1 New York. High drama no? And the $46,000 question is … does this play provide the turning point for LA?

Third Period

It’s seven minutes into the third before the Rangers register their first shot on goal – their only shot on goal in this period. But credit them for holding the lead in spite of the heavy pressure.

Lundqvist is inspiring. It says a lot about an athlete when he can take his game to another level at a time like this.

Good for New York and good for hockey that the Rangers prevail. From the club’s point of view, that’s a foothold. The lone bright example of what can be done when your goaler outplays even himself and you get a bounce or two. However, you’re still left with the feeling that the inevitable is yet to come. It’s still just a question of what form it will take. The Rangers won’t erase that feeling until they pull off the improbable … winning Game 5 in LA. Only then does this series become interesting again.

See you around the rink.

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POSTED ON Saturday, 06.07.2014 / 1:04 PM


First Period

Rangers come out carrying the tempo for most of the opening period; exactly what they needed to do. Far more urgency than they showed in the opening game. If you pressure the opposition enough, it is bound to result in your opponent making plays they do not want to make. Case in point, Justin Williams’ turnover that leads to the McDonagh goal at 10:48. Williams is being pressured above and below when he coughs it up. 1-0 New York.

Lundqvist is seeing chances that are far more difficult than those faced by Quick at the other end. He’s a difference maker in the early going.

Matt Greene’s turnover at the Ranger blueline ultimately leads to the Zuccarello goal. Rangers are in the driver’s seat 2-0; they’ve dictated the pace and held territorial advantage for the majority of the first period. At the end of one, you can’t help but feel “surely to goodness this is the one time that LA spots the opposition two and they don’t come back.”

A key point here, by contrast to Game 1, is that New York did not allow the Kings life late in the period. Remember Clifford’s goal at 17:33 of the first period in Game 1. That was the Kings’ foothold.

Second Period

There’s a lot to like in the Kings’ Justin Williams. His resilience for example. In the opening period, he’s responsible for the turnover that results in the Rangers’ first goal. On a similar play but this time in the offensive end, Williams is again under pressure. However, he makes a perfect play this time. Rather than force the puck, off balance, to a protected Rangers’ net he throws it back into the high slot and finds Stoll who squibs it past Lundqvist and Klein. Now it’s 2-1 Rangers.

From an LA point of view, you hate that you weren’t able to reverse momentum anytime in the first period. It’s fair consolation though that you get on the board and cut the Ranger lead in half less than two minutes into the second period.

Half way through regulation and the Rangers are going hit for hit with the Kings. Are they leading for this reason? I suggest that’s part of it; see last blog.

Mitchell draws LA to within a goal. 3-2 Rangers. But on the very next play he fails to clear it behind the net off the ensuing draw and Zuccarello feeds Brassard. A momentum swing like this should put the Rangers in a spot where they can close this game out if they manage it well.

Third Period

The no goalie interference call on LA’s third goal is defensible. McDonagh closes on Clifford hard as the Kings forward works his way back to the net front. What’s more important than the goal itself though is the response of both teams. LA finds life and New York sags; Gaborik scores as a result. It’s now a 4-4 game.

A reminder. LA started this period down 4-2 against a team that is 10-0 this season when leading after two. It’s baffling to me how the Kings can make a two-goal turnaround look so routine.

Overtime 1

I fell asleep. That’s neither a random thought nor an observation. That’s just a fact.

Overtime 2

I’m wide awake as Dustin Brown wins it for LA with a deft little redirect from the low slot. Unreal. New York may ultimately win a game as the Series heads back east but will it matter? After the way things have gone through Games 1 and 2, can you see LA failing to win out?

See you around the rink.

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POSTED ON Thursday, 06.05.2014 / 4:22 PM

There’s enough commentary out there providing the all-encompassing account of each game as it’s played. So instead, I offer you random thoughts and observations from Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Finals.

First Period

For the first half of the opening period New York is dictating the pace. LA is spending long stretches of play hemmed in its own end. Interesting though, half way through the first; the Rangers have a team total of three hits and Dustin Brown himself has four. In four shifts. It’s hard to spot but this is how the Kings’ captain leads. Never mind that contact creates turnovers and that turnovers can become chances; when Brown collides with the opposition, it creates energy in the Kings’ camp. And that energy can turn momentum. I suggest that this is part of the explanation why the Kings come back as routinely as they do.

Hagelin’s shorthanded goal makes it 2-0 Rangers. A goal like this should mark the turning point in a Rangers’ win. Instead Carter follows up on a great chance of his own and continues to forecheck deep in the Rangers’ end. Clifford lifts the Carter pass up and over Lundqvist on a play in tight. Now we’re 2-1. The Kings head into the room after one period with a foothold rather than down 2-0. Can’t you already feel it coming?

Second Period

Trevor Lewis is in two on one with Gaborik early in the period. Note to Lewis: if you’re not going to slide it over to the hottest player on any continent, you’ll wanna hit the net at a minimum.

Muzzin goes off for interference at 3:54. There’s a lot to like in the Rangers’ power play. They don’t ultimately convert, but they are moving it exceptionally well and creating promising looks. Good chances for St. Louis and Zuccarello both. LA is on its heels for most of the two minute minor. Keep an eye on this going forward.

Doughty’s fifth of the playoffs comes off a filthy little pick up thrown behind him. Then he pulls this double-clutch thing in the low slot to get Lundqvist moving. We’re tied at twos. Can you believe how routinely LA comes back from a two-goal deficit? At this time of year? For most teams that’s a hill that just cannot be climbed.

Third Period

Past the halfway point of the period and the shots are 13-0 in LA’s favor. Waiting and watching for the moment the Rangers break down.

If you’re New York, on the one hand you’ve got to be thrilled you’re locked in a 2-2 tie this late while facing a team that’s been vastly superior offensively through the first three rounds. On the other hand, the determination of the group at the other end has to be leaving an impression on you.

Overtime

Williams unassisted, four and a half minutes into the fourth period. Wow. Kings win and justice is served. With the exception of a flat start, LA outplayed New York in most every area of Game 1.

If New York intends to make a series of this, in Game 2 they’re going to need to do something dynamic. But what and how? LA defends well, they are producing offensively at a feverish clip, they’re physical and they are far and away the most driven team in recent memory. Toughest task yet for coach Vigneault and his Rangers. Wondering if that New York power play couldn’t provide something to rally around?

See you around the rink.

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POSTED ON Monday, 06.02.2014 / 5:09 PM

The dust settles in the West in fitting fashion. Yet another Game 7 won by the plucky Los Angeles Kings in OT to close out the defending champs. If you saw it you’ll agree, that was a game for the ages.

And so with that, the Rangers can now prepare for a specific Stanley Cup opponent. Here are a few thoughts/predictions, by key categories, as we look forward to the East-West matchup.

Offense

Clear advantage to the Kings here. Kopitar (24pts) leads the post season in offense. Carter (22), Gaborik (19), Williams (18), Doughty (16), and

Toffoli (13) all appear in the top 20 scorers before any Ranger (St. Louis @ 16th with 13 pts) is mentioned.

And all this from a team that struggled to find the back of the net in 2013-14. The Kings had an aggregate of 206 goals for; the fewest of any NHL playoff team. This group has found their touch and its paying obvious dividends. Gaborik especially with a league-leading 12 goals. No single trade deadline pickup has had a stronger impact. The Rangers have not yet faced a team with as robust an offense as the Kings. The Murderous Monarchs move on to Manhattan.

Goaltending

Make no mistake; King Henry is an important part of the explanation as to why the Rangers are still playing in June. Lundqvist’s .928 SV% and his GAA of 2.03 best Quick’s numbers in both categories.

Question is though, as between Quick and Lundqvist, in the context of a single seven game series, who will rise to the occasion and deliver?

To that end, there’s a lot to like in Quick. He has more deep playoff experience and he is one who will raise his level based on the moment. Lundqvist’s game has looked fallible at times in the post season. See Game 5 of the ECF – four goals on just 19 shots. Neither will play perfect hockey but Quick will play better.

Intangibles

The marathon that is the Stanley Cup is the toughest in all of team sport. And for that reason, it takes a healthy measure of character to be the last team standing. One noteworthy statistic tells the tale here. No other NHL team has been to seven games in all three prior series and still made it to the Finals. Does this leave the Kings out of gas for the fourth and final round? Maybe. But I doubt it. LA has played just one more game than its Eastern opponent. Fatigue should be a non-factor.

I’ve never experienced it but I can only imagine the buzz inside the Kings’ room right now. Having come out on top in three seventh games has to leave you with a serious case of “this is our destiny.”

Prediction

Your Stanley Cup Champion comes out of the West once again in my estimation. LA in six; this talented group will not be denied.

See you around the rink.

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POSTED ON Thursday, 01.23.2014 / 4:41 PM

The Nashville Predators radio play-by-play duo of Stu Grimson and Willy Daunic break down Wednesday's trade for Michael Del Zotto before the team takes on the Vancouver Canucks tonight at Rogers Arena.

Listen Here

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POSTED ON Wednesday, 01.22.2014 / 6:01 PM

Today, the Predators traded mainstay defender Kevin Klein to the New York Rangers in exchange for Rangers defenseman Michael Del Zotto. A few thoughts on the net impact on the Predators roster on the ice and in terms of the economics.

On the Ice

Klein was steady in his own end; a very capable defender slotted typically in the Preds’ second or third pairing. A hard-nosed player (see Antoine Roussel on 01.20.14) who was not afraid to activate up ice. Though “Kleiner” was not a person you looked to for offense consistently. A player like this will be missed; a great shot blocker and he could be a calming influence in your own end.

On the other hand, the most notable characteristic Del Zotto brings to the table is an upside up-ice. And for obvious reasons, David Poile is looking to boost production. Stepping into the Rangers roster directly out of the OHL, Del Zotto posted a remarkable 37 points, including nine goals, in 2009-10. In 2011-12, he set a career best scoring 10 goals while posting 41 total points. There’s lots to like here, providing Del Zotto is able to overcome the apparent sporadic play in his own end that saw him scratched from the Rangers lineup for several games earlier this season.

The Money

Klein is a fair value with a cap hit of $2.9m for this and the next four years. That number would be considered in range for a defenseman ranked anywhere from third to fifth on an NHL roster. So if you’re New York, you get cap certainty on a mainstay in your lineup.

Moving Klein gives you space today and going forward to make even significant adjustments to your lineup for a team that may be reconsidering whether it satisfactorily restored its identity last summer. Especially considering that you just moved Matt Hendricks and freed up nearly $5 million for the next three years in the aggregate.

Poile now has the cap (and budget) room to add key pieces up front if the right move presents itself – not to mention the flexibility to resign his newly-acquired defenseman if he proves to be a good fit. Del Zotto is a restricted free agent in the coming summer. He is apt to want something north of his current $2.5 million. However, Poile holds measurable leverage given that Del Zotto is coming off a lackluster first half and the Predators hold a right to match any other offer.

Taken together, the Hendricks/Klein transactions created significant cap space for 2014-15 and beyond. A not so subtle signal that other moves and/or signings are to come? Think so.

See you around the rink.

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POSTED ON Thursday, 01.16.2014 / 6:01 PM


Today from Philly, Nashville Predators radio play-by-play tandem of Stu Grimson and Willy Daunic discuss yesterday's trade for Devan Dubnyk.

Click here to listen

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POSTED ON Friday, 11.15.2013 / 11:12 AM

The Predators celebrate 15 years of hockey during the 2013-14 season. Having played in the early years (2001-2003), an anniversary like that gives you cause to reflect. The one thing about this game though; it’s not so much the game itself as it is the guys you play with that sticks with you.

So, in this series, I am highlighting a few of the Preds I played with. They are chosen not so much for their abilities on the ice as they are for their personality off it. Said another way. Chosen not so much for their character but more for the fact that they were characters. See the difference?

Reid Simpson: “Simmer” and I were teammates but we never played together. I was injured from December of 2001 on and it was unclear that I would return to action. Therefore, David Poile went out and acquired Reid; he was a great pro, he had been around and he knew his role well - lead and be a physical presence.

The one wrinkle to Simmer joining the group was the fight he and I had the previous year while he was a member of the Blues and I was playing with the Kings. Watch here

If you didn’t understand hockey players you would have projected that Simmer and I on the same team would have been a distraction to the rest of the team. Not so. Reason being, Simmer let the air out of the situation very early on.

I believe it was his first day as a Predator when Simmer declared “Did you guys know Stu and I fought last year … yea, true story, I came in third place!!!”

What a beauty.

See you around the rink.

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POSTED ON Sunday, 10.06.2013 / 6:10 PM

The Predators celebrate 15 years of hockey during the 2013-14 season. Having played in the early years (2001-2003), an anniversary like that gives you cause to reflect. The one thing about this game though; it’s not so much the game itself as it is the guys you play with that sticks with you. 

So, in this series, I am highlighting a few of the Predators I played with. They are chosen not so much for their abilities on the ice as they are for their personality off it. Not so much for their character but more for the fact that they were characters. See the difference?

Scott Walker. “Walks” was a beauty. At least once a week, Bill Houlder and I would have a conversation where one of us was saying “you won’t believe what he just did.”

Walker and I were both out of the lineup with concussions in January of 2002. So when the team was out of town he and I would hang out. One night I had him over for dinner and we decided to take in a movie after. We took two cars from my place because we would go separate directions after the movie was over. Him to his house and me to mine.

Driving to the theater from my place, I took the back roads through Williamson County. He’d never been this route before but it was no big deal because he was following me in his vehicle.

We see our movie at Green Hills Mall. And as we get to the theater parking lot, I say goodnight. Scott responds “well, where you goin’?’” I said “it’s 11:30, I’m going home.”

Walker says “well, that’s just great, but how do I get home?” “Walks” I said, “you’ve been to this theater dozens of times. Just drive home.”

“But I don’t know that way we came” replies Walker. I said “Scott, you know where we are right?” “Yes,” he says. “You know where your house is right?” “Well, yeah but….” “Well, just drive from here to your house like you would normally. You don’t need to drive the route we took to get here.”

I know what you’re thinking. Wasn’t he displaying symptoms of post concussion syndrome? Uh, no. That’s Walks. Again, a real beauty.

See you around the rink.

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POSTED ON Wednesday, 08.28.2013 / 1:57 PM

The Predators will celebrate 15 years of hockey during the 2013-14 season. Having toiled in the organization as a player in the formative years (2001-2003), an anniversary like that gives you cause to reflect. Having said that, the one thing about this game …. it’s not so much the game itself as it is the people you meet while playing it that sticks with you.

In the coming weeks, I intend to highlight a few players I played with while a Predator. They are chosen not so much for their abilities on the ice as they are for their personality off it. Not so much for their character but more for the fact that they were characters. See the difference?

Jere Karalahti. It’s not uncommon for a manager to discuss a potential transaction with a current player on his roster before he pulls the trigger. That was the case in 2002 when David Poile called me in to an operations meetingto get my opinion on Jere Karalahti – a Los Angeles King at the time. The “Chief” and I played and roomed together in L.A the year before I came to Nashville. So David wanted to get my take on the big Finn.

David and the rest of the operations staff were focused on two things primarily. What did I think of his game and what kind of person was he? The answer to the first was fairly straightforward. Big, pretty physical and solid defensively;
he could help us.

The answer to the second question required a little more detail. You see, Jere had a hearty appetite for the part of the game that happened after the game was over. He looked like the front man for a metal band and he lived up to one specific part of that persona. He liked to go out … a lot … until very early in the morning. I told the staff that if we brought him in that we’d need to keep him on a short leash.

Long story short; lower Broadway became the Chief’s playground. We got him at the trade deadline that year and I don’t believe he lasted the rest of the year. He played all of 15 games before defecting back to the motherland. His challenges away from the game are well documented. Apparently, pro hockey in Finland is a little less structured than the NHL; a better fit for the Chief at the end of the day.

See you around the rink.

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